What is Edinburgh Famous/Known For?

The Royal Mile

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Preparing for a trip to Edinburgh? If you are preparing a getaway to the Scottish capital and want to know the essentials without giving up those less typical corners, this guide is for you. We’ll show you 10 things Edinburgh is famous for. Forget the traditional guides and get ready to fully explore the magical Scottish capital! The Old Town is Edinburgh’s most famous neighborhood, and the Royal Mile is its backbone, a crowded avenue of museums, souvenir shops, street performers, pubs and more. The most characteristic parts of it are the dozens of narrow alleys that make their way between historic buildings. Strolling through the Royal Mile and its alleys from the Castle, on the west end, to the Palace of Holyrood, in the east, is something you have to do no matter what in the Scottish capital. But it is also the most touristic avenue in the city, so be prepared to encounter huge crowds. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Edinburgh Castle

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Even if you have not yet set foot in Edinburgh, you can surely imagine its majestic Castle standing on top of a volcanic rock, keeping watch over the city night and day. The Edinburgh Castle is a symbol, and thousands of travelers visit daily the highest point of the Royal Mile to see the fortress and soak up the history of Scotland and its capital between the walls. If you decide to visit the Castle, we recommend you book between 2 and 3 hours. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Victoria St. and Grassmarket

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The colorful facades of Victoria Street form another of the most emblematic images of Edinburgh’s Old Town. Go down this picturesque street, stopping at its stores (some of them, with a Harry Potter theme, since they say that J.K. Rowling was inspired by Victoria St to create the Diagon alley) and you will arrive at Grassmarket. In past centuries, this walk was a bustling market of cattle and artisans, and also one of the places where public executions were carried out in Edinburgh. Nowadays, Grassmarket has been stripped of any terrible trace and is full of pubs and restaurants that give it a lively atmosphere. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Princes St. and its Gardens

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Princes Street is the main avenue of the New Town, the New City of Edinburgh, and one of the busiest streets in the capital along with the Royal Mile. Buses and trams run at all hours, and the northern part is composed of one store after another: chains such as Primark or Urban Outfitters, department stores such as Jenner’s or Debenhams, supermarkets, coffee shops and more. The curious thing about Princes St. is that the southern part is not built: instead of buildings, there are Princes St. Gardens, fabulous gardens for a walk or sit down to eat an ice cream on a day of good weather. The gardens are also a natural border between the Old Town and the New Town, and from there you can see the silhouette of the Old Town (for even more incredible views, forget the vertigo and climb the Scott Monument). Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Calton Hill

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The image we all imagine of Edinburgh is the classic snapshot taken from Calton Hill, a small hill at the east end of Princes St. Climbing is very simple (there are stairs and a conditioned road) and, from above, you will enjoy postcard views, with the Dugald Stewart monument in the foreground and, behind, the Balmoral hotel tower, the Old Town and the Castle emerging on the horizon. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

The Grayfriars Cemetery

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Greyfriars Cemetery, in Old Town, has all the ingredients to catch visitors: the legend of the puppy Bobby, that says he veiled his master’s grave for years; an alleged poltergeist named Mackenzie; corners related to Harry Potter and more. It is one of the places you have to see in Edinburgh no matter what, and not only for the stories it hides, but also for its beauty. Many Scottish cemeteries, far from dingy, are inspiring, and Greyfriars’ is one of them. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

The National Museum of Scotland

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Scottish history, science and technology, interactive exhibitions for children and adults, all in a wonderful building giving shelter to all these treasures. The National Museum of Scotland, a stone’s throw from the Royal Mile, is one of Edinburgh’s essential jewels. And, in addition, it is free, which makes it an unbeatable option if you have free time or if you need to take refuge on a rainy day or if the first visit falls short and you want to repeat at another time. Just don’t forget to climb the panoramic terrace! Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Arthur’s Seat

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Arthur’s Seat Hill stands in Holyrood Park, in the heart of Edinburgh. Although it is the highest in the city, its figures are modest: 251 meters high accessible to almost everyone. You only need a couple of hours, a shot of energy and be eager to enjoy an incredible panorama of the city. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Dean Village

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Every city has some dissonant and surprising corner; in the case of Edinburgh, this is Dean Village, an old mill village bathed by the Water of Leith River. Although it is not very far from the center, the houses next to the water form an idyllic landscape that nobody would place in a big city. Exploring Dean Village and walking along the path that follows the river is always a pleasure and, although the guides are already echoing this place, it is still not as crowded as others. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

The New Town

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The New Town is the neighborhood of homogeneous structure that extends north of the Old Town and Princes St. Gardens. It was designed and built as an escape from the overcrowded Old Town, and they cannot be more different: while one conveys intrigue with its alleys and crowded buildings, the other distills greatness and order. It is one of the essential places to see in Edinburgh, so reserve a couple of hours to stroll through the lovely Rose St, get to know the elegant shops and restaurants of George St and walk the surrounding streets.