Amphitheatrum Flavium

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Only a few people might have known that the Roman Colosseum was once called Amphitheatrum Flavium. After some time, it was eventually called the Colosseum, as it would refer to the amphitheater used for entertainment and sports. You might have noticed that it is spelled differently from the word coliseum, which is of the same meaning. Click the next ARROW to see the next image!

Gate Of Death

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The West Exit has another name before it has adapted its new moniker. This portion of the Colosseum was indeed named the Gate of Death. This exit was popular as it was the passageway of defeated gladiators from the deadly contest. Click the next ARROW to see the next image!

Massive Earthquake Hit The Colosseum

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In 847 A.D., a huge earthquake has destroyed the southern side of the Colosseum. The current structure has been attributed to many factors, specifically earthquakes. Although the structure was not built on a fault line, the tremors still reached the city of Rome from some 50 miles or more. Click the next ARROW to see the next image!

Botanists Love The Colosseum

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The Colosseum was indeed a favorite point of destination by the botanists. In 1643 onwards, more than 337 species of plants grew among the ruins. From the outside, you can never imagine this many species to have taken root in this popular Roman structure. Click the next ARROW to see the next image!

First Gladiator Fights

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In 80 A.D., the first games held at the Colosseum lasted for 100 days. There were around 3,000 gladiator fights during these days. It was under the rule of Emperor Titus. The last games were held in 435 A.D. Click the next ARROW to see the next image!

Used For Mock Naval Battles

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When the mock Naval battles took place, the wooden floor of the structure was removed. Likewise, the lower cells were filled with water. It was not as popular as the gladiator fights, so they were moved elsewhere leaving the wooden floor as it is. Click the next ARROW to see the next image!

Should Have Been Built Elsewhere

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During ancient times, the city was constructed around the riverbanks. Thus, the Colosseum would have actually been situated on the city’s outskirts. You can just imagine it to be out of the city with all its glory. Click the next ARROW to see the next image!

Appears On The Reverse Side Of A Euro Coin

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You might haven’t noticed it, but if you look closely at the reverse side of the 5 cent Euro coin, you can see the Colosseum on it. In fact, Euro zone countries are given the authority to mint their own important monuments from where it was issued on the reverse side. Click the next ARROW to see the next image!

Parts Of The Colosseum Were Used In Building Another Structure

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The Colosseum was a national monument in the city of Rome. However, another structure was built using the marble façade and other parts of this famous monument. The constructed building was known as the St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican City. Click the next ARROW to see the next image!

Realistic Replica Used Instead Of The Famous Colosseum

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During the filming of the Hollywood movie Gladiator, director Ridley Scott found that it would be great to use the Colosseum as a popular venue. However, due to the countless restrictions, including the bureaucracy and red tape, Scott decided to film the movie elsewhere. So, he built a replica instead in Malta costing around $1 million.