Newport Medieval Ship Project

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Newport is a city in south-east Wales, north of Cardiff. It once had the largest coal exporting port in the country, and it is still an industrial area. Arguably its best known landmark is the Newport Transporter Bridge, one of the six operating transporter bridges in the world. You can navigate under it in a gondola or climb its towers and cross the walkway. Transportation enthusiasts enjoy the engine room and visitor center, as well as the nearby Fourteen Locks Visitor Center. The Geraint Thomas National Velodrome in Wales is an attraction for cyclists. The Newport Museum and Art Gallery has exhibits at Chartists, while Roman remains are displayed at Caerleon. The underground art scene is growing, with emerging shows and theatrical productions. Here are the most beautiful places in Newport you must see when you visit! Starting the list with this ship project, the naval enthusiast in you might be interested in this glorious spot. This project features a sailing vessel made during fifteenth century and has been discovered by archaeologists in South Wales. This is still currently in a state of restoration but it is already opened for viewing. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Walnut Tree Farm Park

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A lovely small farm that is easily accessible for tourists is quite a plus for Newport. It considered as a rural attraction that is suitable for families. You can even bring your toddlers here are there are a lot of attractions they might enjoy. It has nice play facilities that are safe for children. Walnut (Juglans regia) is a fruit tree belonging to the Jugolaceae family and native to Persia. This tree expanded to Gregia and then to Italy and the rest of European countries, with the following official cultivated species: European walnut, ashy walnut, black walnut and California walnut. Walnut cultivation cannot occur if there is no minimum rainfall, which is around 700mm, or efficient artificial irrigation. In addition, walnut is a tree that does not tolerate late spring frosts or too high temperatures without sufficient humidity. This type of temperatures can cause damage to the walnut fruit: the walnut. Regarding the land necessary to cultivate a walnut tree, we will say that it is a very neutral and flexible tree in this sense, although the preferred soils for this tree are deep and loose soils. The walnut is a very tall deciduous tree that can reach 27 meters in height and has a trunk with, nothing more and nothing less than, 2 meters in diameter, although some specimens of 5 meters in diameter have been found. It is a sturdy trunk of a color that turns grayish and from which grow the abundant and vigorous branches that will form a huge rounded crown and that have a reddish color when they are still young, to later turn into a brown color. Walnut branches are full of huge leaves up to 35 cm in length. The young branches are thick and knotty, with the medulla typically empty and divided by transverse separators. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Fourteen Locks Canal and Conference Center

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This features a lock series called Cefn Flight and is set in the Crumlin Arm of the Monmouthshire Canal in Rogerstone. It is among the top steepest rises in the UK. It also has a nice café and a nice atmosphere for a walk. This historical sight was completed in 1799. In 1799, fourteen locks were built on the banks of the Brecon Canal to connect Newport with the extensive mineral transport network. This hydraulic engineering structure is undergoing a rehabilitation plan. The water tanks and the old locks, devoured by the vegetation, are lined with trees and green spaces. We come here for a picnic or a walk. A visitor center teaches about the history of this transportation route. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Belle Vue Park

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It is one of the public parks of Newport and has a Victorian style. It is famous for having been awarded by a Green Flag Award in 2008. It has been there since 1891 and has been opened ever since to its citizens. It has conservatories and a pavilion as well as rockeries and bandstands. Belle Vue Park is located in Newport, Wales, United Kingdom. The city has around 140,000 inhabitants and lies in the south of the country on the banks of the Usk River, between the cities of Cardiff and Bristol. Famous for its docks, the Roman remains at Caerleon and its association with the 19th century chartist movement, Newport is full of cultural surprises. The Belle Vue park, which covers approximately 106,000 m², was opened in 1894 and has typical features of a Victorian public park, including plant conservatories, pavilion, bandstand and rocks. It has a splendid view of the estuary and is located on a hill behind elegant walls and iron gates. The site has many features typical of a Victorian public park, including conservatories and pavilion, bandstand and ornamental gardens. Additional features have been added to the park over the years. The Gorsedd Stone Circle was built in 1896 for the National Eisteddfod, held in Belle Vue Park in 1897. Bowling areas were opened in 1904 and a teahouse was added in 1910. The bandstand and the original series of small waterfalls were restored in 2006. The Belle Vue Tearooms is run by Cotyledon BMCIC, a community interest company based in Machen that also operates rural markets across southeastern Wales, including a monthly food and craft market in Belle Vue Park. Tea rooms are open daily (including Christmas Day) from 10 am to 4 pm, serving drinks and meals featuring products from market traders. Weddings can be held in conservatories and in the bandstand. There is also a playground and areas for sports practice.Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Caerleon Amphitheater

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If you are interested in the Roman history, then this place will fill you with a lot of information. It has been there since the 90 AD and served as the Roman Legionary fortress. So this is a good place to learn the Roman culture. It has been well preserved and the entry is free for all. The Caerleon Roman Ruins are located near Newport and it was one of the 3 fortresses that the Roman legions built to defend the conquered lands of Britain, its original name was Isca Augusta and to this day the ruins of the barracks, the amphitheater and the military baths have been preserved. Caerleon Amphitheater was built outside the city walls in 90 A.D. and although it is camouflaged among a green meadow it is the best preserved in the United Kingdom. At its peak it could hold up to 6,000 people and is still used today for an annual theatrical performance that depicts life in the legion. Next to the amphitheater are the ruins of the old barracks, unique in all of Europe, and which have served to recognize the great Roman architectural capacity that earned it to become a great empire. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Newport Wetlands

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This is different form the other tourists attractions in Newport as this is a wildlife reserve. It was established in the year 2000 as a wildlife habitat in order to lessen the losses that resulted in the construction of the Cardiff Bay Barage. There are a lot of different kinds of habitat set and rare species of birds and fowls reside here. Wetlands are all those ecosystems whose soils appear permanently or periodically flooded, both in freshwater environments and in those with a certain degree of salinity. In this way, wetland ecosystems include both natural wetlands, such as extensive marshes, swamps and peatlands, as well as those anthropic wetlands that were designed by humans and that artificially retain water, both permanent and temporarily, adapting to environmental conditions. In the next sections we will see in more detail the different types of wetlands that exist as well as the main characteristics of these ecosystems of great natural wealth. Wetlands are classified, first of all, according to the type of water of which they are composed, thus existing freshwater wetlands and salty or salty wetlands. In turn, wetlands can be natural or artificial. Wetlands are one of the most important ecosystems within the proper functioning of nature. And it is not for less, because they are responsible for hosting an incredible biodiversity of species of birds, fish and other groups of animals, as well as a wide variety of plant species characterized by their hydrophilic, water-dependent development. On the other hand, in terms of their value within the anthropic world, wetlands often serve as areas for food production that require large amounts of water for cultivation, such as rice. Other times they are used as areas to obtain raw materials, such as wood and reeds. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Tredegar House

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This lovely house was built in the 17th century during the reign of King Charles II. He was born on May 29, 1630 in London. The second son of Carlos I, and Prince of Wales by birth. He escaped from England and travels to The Hague, from where he tried to save his father twice. When Charles I died in 1649, he assumed the title of king and was proclaimed as such in Scotland and some regions of Ireland, as well as in England, ruled by Oliver Cromwell. He accepted the Scottish crown on January 1, 1651 at Scone, from the Scottish nobleman Archibald Campbell. In August, he invaded England and was proclaimed king at Carlisle. He was defeated by Cromwell at Worcester on September 3, 1651. After the battle he escaped to France. When Cromwell’s death in 1658 and the succession of his son Richard Cromwell as protector lord take place, the demands for the restoration of royalty increased. In February 1660, General George Monck led an army to London and forced the dissolution of the Rump Parliament. The new Parliament demanded the return of Charles and proclaimed him king on May 8, 1660. Edward Clarendon, his companion in exile, was appointed chief of ministers (secretary to the king). Clarendon restored the supremacy of the Church of England, and English and Scottish Presbyterians and Dissidents were persecuted. He consented to the abolition of the feudal rights of knights, guards, and providers in exchange for a significant annuity. It is a country mansion that has been owned by the Morgan family for over five centuries and then Lords Tredegar. This has been utilized as a filming location in quite a number of movies. It also hosts many events and civil ceremonies. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

National Roman Legion Museum

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This museum is another part of the network of the National Museum Wales. This was built in 75 AD and considered a permanent legionary fortress of the Roman Britain. It has a collection of Roman artifacts that depicts the Roman history as experienced in Britain. This would be a great educational site for children. The architect of the theory was not a nobody eager to win front pages in the newspapers. Not much less. It was Sir Mortimer Wheeler, one of the most reputable archaeologists in Britain after having served at the National Museum of Wales and the Museum of London. The doctor did not make his statement lightly either, but was based on a decade of work on the ground and the discovery of what, in his words, were the remains of fifty native (52, in particular) murdered by back with a spear, javelin and arrow blow during the Roman invasion. On this “military cemetery” (as he called it) he forged Vespasian’s theory of barbarism of Legio II Augusta in AD 43. C. A vision that he released in 1943 after writing his first report on the event. This theory, which began to be questioned in the past eighties, has suffered a new setback this Christmas. In this case, from the hand of Dr. Miles Russell, professor of archeology at the University of Bournemouth. This expert has affirmed, in declarations collected by several British newspapers, that the history of the conflict is “misleading” and, at least to this day, there is “absolutely no evidence” that in the aforementioned position any massacre was perpetrated against the habitants. “Most archaeologists agree that it cannot be shown to occur,” he says. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Newport Transporter Bridge

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This transporter bridge runs across the River Usk and is considered a rare structure with only eight of them remaining in the whole world. This transporter design was deliberately chosen because the banks of the river were low at the desired point of crossing. This has also appeared in drama films and movies. The Newport Ferry Bridge (Welsh Pont Gludo Casnewydd) is located in Southport Wales, on the River Usk. Designed by Ferdinand Arnodin and opened in 1906, it is the longest of the 8 preserved shuttle bridges in the world. It is also the most recognizable symbol of the city of Newport. And it is that by the end of the 19th century the possibility of building a new bridge begins to be studied. The east bank of the river had undergone rapid industrial development which was to be accelerated by the installation of a steel mill. The existing bridge could not absorb the increasing traffic, and the ferries had had several tragic accidents. Likewise, the county engineer R. Haynes had heard of a French engineer named Ferdinand Arnodin, who had designed a new type of bridge that could overcome the difficulties of the case – because it was very flat terrain and with a great distance between the banks. – allowing the navigation of tall boats. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Caerleon Roman Baths

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This is also called as the Roman Baths Museum and was also built in 75 AD. What lie inside it is the ruins of the Isca Augusta fortress which is near the Nation Roman Legion Museum. This has a covered sidewalk leading to the military bathhouse. There are also a lot of interesting collections essential to Roman history. Caerleon is located on the Usk River, just outside the city of Newport in South Wales. In this town are the remains of the Iscar legionary camp, as well as the National Museum of the Roman Legion and the Museum of Roman Baths. Iscar was one of only three permanently existing legionary fortresses in Britannia, along with those of Deva (Chester) and Eboracum (York). In the National Museum of Roman Baths, the baths for the Legio II Augusta have been preserved and musealized under a modern roof. An open-air swimming pool (natatio) and a cold water room (frigidarium) have been preserved from the vast thermal complex.