What is Syria Famous/Known For?

The Umayyad Mosque

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The ancient country of Syria lies in the southwestern part of Asia, at the center of the Middle East. The country is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea and Lebanon to the West and Iraq to the East. It shares a border with Turkey to the North, Jordan to the south, and finally Israel to the Southwest. Syria has an estimated population of 17,803,825 inhabitants, whose official language is Arabic. Unfortunately there has been a lot of turmoil involving Syria recently, making it an unsafe location to visit. However, this country has a lot to be famous for, so here are 10 things Syria is famous to the world for. The Umayyad Mosque is also called ‘the Great Mosque of Damascus’ situated in the old city of Damascus. It is one of the world’s oldest and largest mosques. The Umayyad Mosque has the reputation of the ‘4th holiest place in Islam’. It is a place of incredible historical and cultural important and is part of the bone that makes up the country. Al Walid I, his successor, continued with his constructive task. He ordered the erection of the Great Mosque of Damascus and rebuilt that of Medina. In the military field he obtained enormous successes. His armies took Samarkand, Bukhara and Fargana in central Asia, while in the west his general Táreq crossed the strait that separates Africa from Europe and undertook the conquest of Spain. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Krak des Chevaliers

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The Crusader castle is one of the most significant conserved medieval castles across the globe. First constructed between the years 1142 to 1271 by the Hospitaller Order of Saint John of Jerusalem and improved by the Mamluks in the late thirteenth century. The Krak des Chevaliers is listed as one of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The history of the Krak des Chevaliers faithfully reflects that of the Crusades and that of the Christian presence in the Holy Land. Its journey begins in 1031, when the Emir of Homs decided to place in a cliff of difficult access to a garrison of Kurds, whose mission would be to control the roads that linked the coast – about thirty kilometers – with the interior. It seems that the Crusaders of Raymond IV of Tolosa took the castle for the first time in 1099, although it was not definitively occupied until a decade later by Tancredo de Galilea, one of the chiefs of the first crusade. Seeing the strategic weight of the enclave, both military and commercial, the Christians decided to expand and reinforce it. The works started immediately. The great outer wall that would surround the inner fortress was erected and a wide ditch was dug between the two defense lines that were filled with water. Especially powerful were the defenses built on the south face, the only place where the castle opened to flat ground, and almost the only one by which it could be attacked. On that face, before reaching the impressive first canvas of walls, the attackers had to circumvent a slope and save a dry moat, which delayed their approach and allowed defenders to harass them. In 1142 the castle was handed over to the Hospitaller order of St. John of Jerusalem, the hospitable ones, who made it their headquarters for almost a century. From then on he was known as Krak des Chevaliers, although the Muslims still referred to him as The Fortress. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Qal’at Salah El-Din

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Also called the ‘Fortress of Saladin’, Qal’at Salah El-Din is known for its construction quality and the continued existence of its historical stratigraphy. It still keeps its features from the Byzantine beginnings in the tenth century. It is also recognized by UNESCO as one of the World’s Heritage Sites. It is a medieval fortress of enormous dimensions, located about 400m above sea level, in a buttress of the Ansariyya mountains, about 35km northwest of the coastal city of Latakia, north of the country. The castle of Saladin is the result of successive constructions, improvements and expansions carried out between the 10th and 15th centuries by the various forces that dominated the area, from the Hamdanis, Byzantines, hospital crusaders, Ayyubis and Mamluks. The citadel is hidden between high peaks and deep ravines, through which winding roads lead to the fortress, which controlled the route between Latakia and the Ghab plain, to the north. The green and high cypresses sway with the Mediterranean breeze, while in the fertile valleys grow olive, citrus and fruit trees, irrigated by generous rivers and streams. In those forests live foxes and wolves, in the plain there are abundant cows and lambs that graze tasty pastures. Looking up at the sky, blackbirds, partridges, pigeons and the majestic eagles fly over us. In that enclave the castle was raised in ancient times. His name was changing according to its owners. The Crusaders called it “Saone”, while the Muslims called it “Sahyun.” They say that this denomination derives from the name “Sigon”, of Phoenician origin, mentioned in relation to the invasion of Alexander the Great. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Cuisine

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The national food of the people is kibbeh (a deep-fried croquette normally packed with minced beef or lamb). However, Syrians also have other delicacies including hummus, pastırma, mujaddara, labneh, etc. Syria is a country that has four millennia of history behind it, from the mythical city of Damascus, and is the largest country in the Middle East, bordered by Turkey, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon and Israel. All this baggage is reflected in a very deep way in his kitchen, and to approach his gastronomic culture, which is delicious, we have gone to an authentic Syrian restaurant, so that its owner shares his exquisite recipes more popular and easy to elaborate. In his homeland, Ghada Hussien was a career biochemist, with extensive experience as such internationally. But given the difficulty of validating his degree when he came to Spain more than a decade ago, he set up the Buena Cara Restaurant and became a cook. Their specialties are many, from the mezzes or entrees through the skewers and arayes, to the tasty and forceful stews. But here we bring you six of the simplest ones to bring Syria closer to your table. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

The Shouting Valley

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The Shouting Valley is a spot where four countries- Syria, Israel, Jordan, and Lebanon meet. The place got the name because of how people often communicate with their relatives across the valley with megaphones. The Golan Heights plateau is located on the border between Israel, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan, and covers some 1,800 square kilometers, mostly under Israeli military occupation since 1967, after the Six Day War. Years later, in 1981, the Israeli Parliament approved its annexation, but this action was declared null and void by the United Nations. Syria and Israel are still technically at war, although in the line of separation there has been a relative calm until today, here Druze and Israelis live in a certain harmony, although there is still evidence of the conflict: ruins of old barracks and bunkers abandoned on Mount Bental , which can also be visited without problems, there is even a coffee shop, Coffee Annan, with views over the Golan Plateau and the Syrian city of Quneitra. The highlands of the Golan are located east of the Sea of ​​Galilee, and are a surprisingly beautiful area full of history, culture and spectacular landscapes: mountains, parks and vineyards, some of their wineries have the best wines in the world, it is a good place to make wine tastings and tour the vine fields. And you can also do abundant outdoor activities: rafting, trekking, canyoning, cycling and there is even a ski slope on Mount Hermon, which also has activities in summer with organized excursions by jeep, bicycles or on horseback. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Lake Assad

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Lake Assad is the largest lake in the country. The man-made lake has been in existence since 1968 with a surface area of about 610sqkm (maximum) and a maximum volume of 11.7 cubic km. Before the Taqba Dam will dam the Euphrates River in northern Syria in the 1970s, an archeological site called Abu Hureyra witnessed the time when ancient nomadic people first settled and began to cultivate. A large mound marks the settlement, which is now under Lake Assad. But before the lake formed, archaeologists were able to carefully extract and describe much material, including parts of houses, food and tools, a great deal of evidence that allowed them to identify the transition to agriculture almost 12,800 years ago. It was one of the most important events in the cultural and environmental history of our Earth. It turns out that Abu Hureyra has another story to tell, according to new research. Found among cereals and grains and sprinkled on the first building materials and animal bones was molten glass, some features that suggest that it formed at extremely high temperatures, much higher than what humans could achieve at that time, or that could be attributed to fire, lighting or volcanism. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Damascus steel

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The capital city of Syria, Damascus is well-known across the world for its steel. The alluring part of Damascus steel is its special patterns. The weapons play a major role in ancient warfare, but today, it’s used in the fabrication of fancy swords and knives. Damascus steel is part of a type of steel manufactured in India that spread throughout the world until it reached Damascus. The great multitude of existing espaderos in the capital of Syria, expanded the ways of manufacturing Damascus steel and managed to achieve a type of durable and non-brittle steel. Thus was born Damascus steel also called Damascus steel. The Toledo and those of Damascus have always had a very close relationship, so that the Toledo teachers investigated the composition of Damascus steel, its veined surfaces with precious iridescence and its ability to be strong, without breaking or bending. After the results obtained, they realized that the basis of the quality of damascus steel was precisely the veining of the blades. In this same sense, we must also remember that the waters of the Tagus River have been. Attributed extraordinary properties that give quality to swords and Toledo knives: their sands, where it is believed that the key to that quality resides. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

Culture

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The age-old country has a long history of culture. Dabke is a national cultural dance that is often mixed with line dancing and circle dance. The dance is performed at traditional festivals, weddings or during childbirth. Other traditional dances include the al-Samah and the sword dance. The vast majority of the Syrian population practices the Sunni branch of Islam. Other Muslim groups are Alawites, Ismailis and Shiites; As for non-Muslims, most are Christians, mainly Greeks and Orthodox Armenians. Among the religious minorities are the Druze, who follow a religion related to Islam, and a community of no more than 4,000 Jews. Primary education is free and compulsory for all children, but in 2005 only 78.4% of adults were literate. In 2000, primary schools had an annual enrollment of 2,835,023 students, 1,124,752 students attended secondary schools and 6.1% of the adults were in higher education. Syria has universities in Damascus, Aleppo, Homs and Latakia. Also in Damascus is the Arab Academy (1919), which is dedicated to the study of Arabic language, literature, history and culture. Other institutes and university schools specialize in social work, agriculture, industry, technology and music. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

City of Jasmine

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Wherever you hear of the word ‘City of Jasmine,’ you know they are talking about Damascus. The capital city of Syria is also known in the country as ash-Sham. Damascus is one of the world’s oldest cities as it was founded in the Third millennium B.C. It contains about 125 monuments built at different eras of its history and is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Damascus is a city of great beauty, hence it is known as the city of Jasmine and also Paradise of the East. It is one of the oldest cities in the world. Damascus is part of the UNESCO World Heritage catalog. It is one of the few cities that have been inhabited continuously since ancient times. Damascus has an immense legacy of almost all the cultures that passed through the site where the city currently stands or that settled in it. It is a long story, which begins approximately in the year 6300 a. C. with the first settlement. We visited her before the civil war broke out and the memory is incredible. All of us who travel when we see the images of war and destruction that have originated from the sites visited and the death of its people produce a strong emotion. We saw the castle of Crac de los Caballeros, Aleppo, Damascus, Palmira. Click the next ARROW to see the next photo!

The Citadel of Aleppo

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It is thought of to be one of the largest and oldest castles in the world as it’s origin can be traced back to the Third millennium B.C. The attractive citadel is inscribed since 1986 as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since. The Aleppo Citadel is the Crac de Caballeros antagonist that we will see in a couple of days. Of completely Islamic origin, it was the base fortress that the Arabs used to confront and defeat the Crusaders. Aleppo Citadel Mosque Omeya San Simeon Syria travel with friends travel custom souk. Inside two mosques, a replica of a Roman theater (for shows), passageways, warehouses and enviable views of the entire city. Aleppo Citadel Umayyad Mosque Saint Simeon Syria travel with friends personalized travel souk Aleppo Citadel Umayyad Mosque Saint Simeon Syria travel with friends personalized travel souk. It is the first day that we have a regular time, even when the sun goes down it is cold. It is also true that we are in the Citadel at the top of the city. The interior of the citadel is quite ruinous although they continue with a multitude of restoration works. One of the most outstanding visits is the Throne Room.